RIDING THE RAILS

Film Credits

Riding the Rails

A FILM BY MICHAEL UYS and LEXY LOVELL

U.S.A, 1997, 72 min, color

 

Directors/Producers/Screenwriters:

Michael Uys and Lexy Lovell

Cinematographer: Samuel Henriques

Additional Photography: Matt Mindlin

Sound: Neil Riha

Editor: Howard Sharp

Associate Editor: Roger Schulte

Music: Jimmie Rodgers, Doc Watson, Woody Guthrie, Elizabeth Cotten, Brownie 
McGhee, Sonny Terry

Original Music: Jay Sherman-Godfrey

Additional Music: Jimmy Weinstein

THE PEOPLE IN THE FILM IN ORDER OF APPEARANCE:


Jim Mitchell
Clarence Lee
Rene Champion
Peggy De Hart
John Fawcett
Charley Bull
Bob "Guitar Whitey" Symmonds
James San Jule
Arvel "Sunshine" Pearson
C.R. "Tiny" Boland

RIDING THE RAILS - American Experience


Riding the Rails: American Experience | Home | Timeline | Teachers Guide

The Good Soldier

THE GOOD SOLDIER

A FILM BY LEXY LOVELL AND MICHAEL UYS

“The Good Soldier” follows the journeys of five combat  veterans from different generations of American wars as they sign up, go into battle, and eventually change their
minds about what it means to be a good soldier.

A film that could not be more timely, “The Good Soldier” poses the question: What is it that makes a good soldier?

The answer: The ability to kill other human beings.

“The Good Soldier” reveals how soldiers simultaneously grapple with their duty and their own humanity.

The veterans tell of their alien surroundings, their connection to their comrades, and the ghastliness of their reality. Some were wounded, some lost their buddies, some lost their sanity as they tried to quench their intense thirst for revenge by killing the enemy and, consequently, killing civilians. Some buried the enormity of their actions and did not  speak of them -- knowing only that they were following orders their commanders had required to conduct the war.

Each man, in his own time, discovers the courage to confront his past actions and begin his healing. Even though they are still haunted by their time in combat, their ability to face themselves in their waking life and achieve self- reconciliation, is the mark of true valor.

“…as affecting a movie as I’ve ever seen… Really powerful stuff.” - Jason Albert, TheOnion

“This is one incendiary movie.” - Robert Butler, Kansas City Star

“A wonderful film…brilliant…” - Howard Zinn

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